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Thursday, May 24, 2007

Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

31 comments:

Anonymous said...

at least Austin's reunion made up for their sack of shit season.

me said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
me said...

i just saw this story here - http://thedailybox.com/wire/?p=68 - and then i came right here to check it out. i can't wait for this!

Anonymous said...

poop

Anonymous said...

penis shit

Anonymous said...

scrotum nibbler

Anonymous said...

vagina cheese

Anonymous said...

blueberry twat waffle

Anonymous said...

yeast rectum

Anonymous said...

i can't wait!

Anonymous said...

for yeast rectum?

Anonymous said...

Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Anonymous said...

Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

Anonymous said...

WORST. REUNION. EVER. and you could so tell everyone hated colie lmao

Anonymous said...

who ever wrote about pokemon is an idiot! all I have to say is we're in America now...

Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

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"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
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11:45 PM
Comment deleted

This post has been removed by the author.

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

3:52 PM
Anonymous said...

WORST. REUNION. EVER. and you could so tell everyone hated colie lmao

4:05 PM
Anonymous said...

who ever wrote about pokemon is an idiot! all I have to say is we're in America now...

4:54 PM
Anonymous said...

can't sleep...shit the bed again

12:14 AM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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Anonymous said...

Wow, I was actually thinking about looking up information on Pokemon. Thank you!

Anonymous said...

Post a Comment On: The Real World and Road Rules Blog
"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
20 Comments - Show Original Post Collapse comments

Anonymous said...

at least Austin's reunion made up for their sack of shit season.

11:45 PM
Comment deleted

This post has been removed by the author.

12:11 AM
me said...

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12:12 AM
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12:36 AM
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7:35 AM
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10:12 AM
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1:04 PM
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1:11 PM
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1:17 PM
Anonymous said...

Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Pokémon
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

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3:52 PM
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4:05 PM
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4:54 PM
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12:14 AM
Anonymous said...

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"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
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11:45 PM
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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

3:52 PM
Anonymous said...

WORST. REUNION. EVER. and you could so tell everyone hated colie lmao

4:05 PM
Anonymous said...

who ever wrote about pokemon is an idiot! all I have to say is we're in America now...

4:54 PM
Anonymous said...

can't sleep...shit the bed again

12:14 AM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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12:22 AM
Anonymous said...

Wow, I was actually thinking about looking up information on Pokemon. Thank you!

12:31 PM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

i want 2 touch ur boobies spammer

Anonymous said...

i r flexible

Anonymous said...

i watch the shit they should have shown... and it is way better than the season, definitely watch it

Anonymous said...

Never one to defend Susie -- it's not her "oops." She only reads what is on the teleprompter. Either its a produciton screw up or MTV changed their schedule. Come on guys, get a grip...

Anonymous said...

no one really gives a shit who's fault it is. it's not a big deal.

Anonymous said...

Post a Comment On: The Real World and Road Rules Blog
"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
28 Comments - Show Original Post Collapse comments

Anonymous said...

at least Austin's reunion made up for their sack of shit season.

11:45 PM
Comment deleted

This post has been removed by the author.

12:11 AM
me said...

i just saw this story here - http://thedailybox.com/wire/?p=68 - and then i came right here to check it out. i can't wait for this!

12:12 AM
Anonymous said...

poop

12:36 AM
Anonymous said...

penis shit

7:35 AM
Anonymous said...

scrotum nibbler

10:12 AM
Anonymous said...

vagina cheese

11:43 AM
Anonymous said...

blueberry twat waffle

12:09 PM
Anonymous said...

yeast rectum

1:04 PM
Anonymous said...

i can't wait!

1:11 PM
Anonymous said...

for yeast rectum?

1:17 PM
Anonymous said...

Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

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3:52 PM
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4:54 PM
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12:14 AM
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Post a Comment On: The Real World and Road Rules Blog
"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
18 Comments - Show Original Post Collapse comments

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11:45 PM
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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


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Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

3:52 PM
Anonymous said...

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4:05 PM
Anonymous said...

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4:54 PM
Anonymous said...

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12:14 AM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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12:22 AM
Anonymous said...

Wow, I was actually thinking about looking up information on Pokemon. Thank you!

12:31 PM
Anonymous said...

Post a Comment On: The Real World and Road Rules Blog
"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
20 Comments - Show Original Post Collapse comments

Anonymous said...

at least Austin's reunion made up for their sack of shit season.

11:45 PM
Comment deleted

This post has been removed by the author.

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
Jump to: navigation, search
“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

3:52 PM
Anonymous said...

WORST. REUNION. EVER. and you could so tell everyone hated colie lmao

4:05 PM
Anonymous said...

who ever wrote about pokemon is an idiot! all I have to say is we're in America now...

4:54 PM
Anonymous said...

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12:14 AM
Anonymous said...

Your comment has been saved.
It may take a moment for your comment to appear on the site at the original post
Post a Comment On: The Real World and Road Rules Blog
"Oops! Susie says that The Sh*& They Should've Shown airs at 10, when Reunited airs"
18 Comments - Show Original Post Collapse comments

Anonymous said...

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11:45 PM
Comment deleted

This post has been removed by the author.

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12:12 AM
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12:36 AM
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10:12 AM
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11:43 AM
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1:04 PM
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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
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Pokémon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Pokemon)
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:26 PM
Anonymous said...

Pokémon
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“Pokemon” redirects here. For the oncogene once called Pokemon, see Zbtb7.
"Pkmn" redirects here. It is also used as an abbreviation for Pikmin.

The official Pokémon logo.Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions, such as the "Pikachu" Nintendo 64) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2]

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the sidestory episodes airing under the name Pokémon Chronicles.

In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4]

Contents [hide]
1 Collecting and playing
2 Generations
3 Game mechanics
3.1 Starter Pokémon
3.2 Pokédex
4 In other media
4.1 Anime series
4.2 Pokémon Trading Card Game
4.3 Manga
5 Criticism
5.1 Racism
5.2 Religion
5.3 Health
6 Cultural influence
7 See also
8 External links
9 References



Collecting and playing
The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are: to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball at it. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can send out any of their Pokémon to wage non-lethal battles against Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increasing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When leveling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, which are techniques used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution.

In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master.


Generations
Main article: Pokémon (video games)
The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games."

All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation.


A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red and Blue.[6]The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8]


Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9]


A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.


An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and PearlIn 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, was released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]



Game mechanics
Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

Starter Pokémon
One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Grass-type, a Fire-type, or a Water-type, Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] For example, in Pokemon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle. The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14]


Pokédex
Main article: Pokédex
The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number.

In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (P★DA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities.


In other media
Main article: Pokémon in other media

Anime series
Main article: Pokémon (anime)

Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners.

The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City.

Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region.


Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen.

The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series was released in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April.

In addition to the TV series, nine Pokémon films have been made, with a tenth slated for release in Japan in July 2007.


Pokémon Trading Card Game
Main article: Pokémon Trading Card Game

Palkia, the Spatial Pokémon Trading Card Game card from Pokémon TCG Diamond and Pearl.The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17]

The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18]The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen.

In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan.


Manga
Main article: Pokémon (manga)
There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Manga is very much different than the Video Games and Cartoons in that the trainers though frowned upon were able to kill the opponent's Pokemon.

Manga released in English
The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
Pokémon Card Master
Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

Criticism
Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo.

As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States.

In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[19]


Religion
Pokémon has been criticized by members of both the Christian and Jewish religions.

After the US release of Pokémon Yellow, a sudden widespread criticism of it passed through Christian congregations primarily by word-of-mouth. Some Christian groups in the United States[20] believe Pokémon to be Satanic in origin, although the topic of religion was never mentioned or referenced in any episode of the anime. Claimed parallels between Pokémon and Satanism include the capturing and invoking of Pokémon to perform tasks, similar to demons; the concept of Pokémon "evolution," which denies some forms of biblical interpretation; and certain abilities of Pokémon, such as psychic or elemental powers, not stated to derive from God. There are also allegations[Who says this?] against Pokémon citing liberal views on morality. For example, James, a character on the anime show, frequently dresses as a woman to disguise himself, giving some the impression that he is a transvestite.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game has been criticized by members of the Jewish community for its use of the swastika, though Nintendo says that this is a matter of cultural misunderstanding, as the swastika and a similar symbol, the manji, have been used in East Asian cultures as a symbol for good fortune by the Hindu religion for thousands of years. The manji was shown only on a Japanese version card and was excluded from the North American release. However, these Jewish groups attacked the Japanese version distributed in the U.S. by unauthorized import. As a result of this controversy Nintendo stopped using this symbol even in the Japanese version.


Health
Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon

One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[21] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy.

This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[22] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others.


Cultural influence
A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. These problems may have occurred because Europe did not fully partake in the spreading culture of the Pokėmon's influences, thus rendering Pokėmon Live not as much of a "hit" as planned.

Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s.


See also
Related topics
Pokémon in other media
Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
List of Pokémon characters
List of Pokémon items
Pokémon regions
Poké Ball
Pokédex
Pokémon (creatures)
List of Pokémon
Pokémon types
Pokémon evolution
Games
Pokémon (video games)
List of Pokémon video games
Pokémon game mechanics
Pokémon Trading Card Game
Television
Pokémon (anime)
List of Pokémon episodes
Banned episodes of Pokémon
Pokémon Chronicles
Miscellaneous
Pikachu Meets the Press



External links
Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
PokémonLook up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Pokémon.com
Pokémon Japan
Pokémon TCG Game
Pokémon Games
Official Pokémon Merchandise Site
Bulbapedia

References
Books
Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
^ Bulbagarden (2007-04-23). Pokémon... Racist?.
^ "Satanism in Pokémon booklet", Cephas Ministry.
^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon"
Categories: Semi-protected | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since May 2007 | 1990s fads | 1995 establishments | 2000s fads | Pokémon | Toys of the 2000s

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3:28 PM
Anonymous said...

can the mother fucker from 3:26 n 3:28 stop posting that bullshit this is about the real world road rules not about pokemon get a fucking live !!!

3:52 PM
Anonymous said...

WORST. REUNION. EVER. and you could so tell everyone hated colie lmao

4:05 PM
Anonymous said...

who ever wrote about pokemon is an idiot! all I have to say is we're in America now...

4:54 PM
Anonymous said...

can't sleep...shit the bed again

12:14 AM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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12:22 AM
Anonymous said...

Wow, I was actually thinking about looking up information on Pokemon. Thank you!

12:31 PM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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8:33 PM
Anonymous said...

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9:03 PM
Anonymous said...

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9:05 PM
Anonymous said...

i want 2 touch ur boobies spammer

9:08 PM
Anonymous said...

i r flexible

11:27 PM
Anonymous said...

i watch the shit they should have shown... and it is way better than the season, definitely watch it

1:15 PM
Anonymous said...

Never one to defend Susie -- it's not her "oops." She only reads what is on the teleprompter. Either its a produciton screw up or MTV changed their schedule. Come on guys, get a grip...

3:22 AM
Anonymous said...

no one really gives a shit who's fault it is. it's not a big deal.

6:38 AM

On last night's rather uneventful Denver Reunion, host Susie Castillo made a major oops when she said that Denver's Sh*& They Should've Shown would be airing on Wednesday May 30th.

Literally, ten seconds later, MTV flashed a banner advertising Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas at the same time.

Here's some clarification:

Wednesday, May 30
8pm - Denver Reunion Special
9pm - Denver Sh*& They Should've Shown
10pm - Reunited: The Real World Las Vegas

Tune in next Wednesday for some great television.

posted by Mr. Real World at 12:01 AM on May 24, 2007
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Anonymous said...

delete those dumb pokemon cmmts

Anonymous said...

Ill fist your dead grandmatha nigga